Global Climate Data Set 2 – Monthly and Decade Average Temperatures

Featured_data2


Introduction

This article contains a link to monthly and decade aggregated Tmax and Tmin values from monitoring stations around the world.

Click here to read part 1 of this series to learn about the daily data I have made available. The data presented in this article is much smaller and more manageable but is derived from the daily data.


Monitoring Stations

I have included my most recent compilation of weather monitoring stations in this article. It is about 24 Mb and is stored in Excel format.

Download Link

  1. All_Climate_Stations

Monthly Aggregated Data

The link below is a zip file that contains an 800 Mb csv file of monthly aggregated temperatures from monitoring stations all around the world. The zip file is about 103 Mb, so it shouldn’t take too long to download.

Download Link

  1.  All_Monthly_Temperature_Records

The fields included in this file are shown in Figure 1.

monthly_data_fields

Figure 1 – Monthly data fields.

Figure 2 is an example of a dashboard that can be built from this data.

 

California_1

Figure 2 – Maximum temperature change over time at a monitoring station in California.


Decade Aggregated Data

The first link below is a zip file that contains a 100 Mb csv file of decade aggregated temperatures from monitoring stations all around the world. The zip file is about 10 Mb, so it will not take too long to download. Figure 3 are the data fields included in this file. Figure 4 is an example of how this type of data can be used in a dashboard.

The second link is a file that represents the temperature changes that have occurred between the decade of the 1960’s to the 2010’s. Figure 5 are the data fields included in this file. Figures 6 and 7 are example dashboards built from that file for the months of March and May, respectively.

Download Links

  1. All_Decade_Temperature_Records
  2. 1960s_and_2010s

 

Decade_data_fields

Figure 3 – The decade aggregated temperature data – the first link.


 

Altergian_Desert

Figure 4 – Maximum temperature changes by month over several decades for a monitoring station in the Algerian desert.


 

 

50_yr_change_fieldsJPG

Figure 5 – Data fields included in the 1960’s to 2010’s temperature change file – the second link.


March_60_to_10

Figure 6 – The March temperature change from US monitoring stations from the 1960’s to the 2010’s.


May_60_to_10

Figure 7 – The May temperature change from US monitoring stations from the 1960’s to the 2010’s.


Final Thoughts

The featured image of this article was taken last week at Hoover Dam. Lake Meade is shown in the background. Do you notice anything surprising?

The lake level is obviously low. You can tell this by the white bleached rocks on the perimeter of the lake. In fact, the overflow spillway (Figure 8) at Hoover Dam has not operated since 1983, or over 34 years. Is this water shortage a sign of climate change? Would the engineers have designed the dam and spillway structures the same way if the precipitation records looked like they do now?

 

20170608_162825

Figure 8 – No action on the Hoover Dam spillway since 1983.


 

You can read about the engineering marvel that is known as Hoover Dam by viewing Figure 9. The sign gives interesting information about this dam.

20170608_162748

Figure 9 – Hoover Dam fun facts.

Final Thoughts

Thanks for reading!

 

2 thoughts on “Global Climate Data Set 2 – Monthly and Decade Average Temperatures

  1. Hi Ken,
    I downloaded the “all_decade_temperature_records.zip” and I was able to find data for North Korea, but not for South Korea (Republic of Korea). I am just wondering no data has been collected for South Korea or not.

    Sangdon

    • Hi Sangdon,

      I just checked the list of worldwide monitoring stations. There are 52 stations in South Korea, but their data timeframes are such that they have not existed long enough (1960’s to now) to be incorporated into my 50-year analysis. I have now placed a link to an Excel spreadsheet that contains the monitoring station information in the part 2 article. Click here to download this climate monitoring station file.

      If you want the South Korea data, I can see if it is in the daily records I posted. If it isn’t, I could easily process those stations and send them to you, although many of them (about 40) are just from the early to mid-1950’s.

      Ken

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